Kentucky Core Healthcare Measures Set Expands to 38 Adult and Pediatric Primary Care Measures

Stephanie Clouser

After a summer of deliberations by committees, the 2019 Kentucky Core Healthcare Measures Set has been finalized, increasing the number of core measures from 34 to 38.

The final vote resulted in the removal of three measures, addition of seven measures, and the upgrade of two measures from “standard” priority to “high” priority. Measures added include opioid treatment agreement, progress towards depression remission, diabetes blood pressure control, childhood and adolescent well care visits, HPV immunization, and patient experience. Measures related to diabetes and cardiovascular disease medication adherence and bronchitis antibiotic avoidance have been removed.

This year’s update ensures that the measures on the core measures set are current, relevant, and sound. The Kentucky Performance Alignment Committee – or PMAC – and its subcommittees have spent the last months reviewing the current measures set, examining potential measures for addition, and confirming or questioning the current measures’ relevance.

The core measures set was developed and released through a public-private partnership with the goal of creating a core measures set for Kentucky stakeholders to align to. The core measures set is focused in the areas of prevention, pediatrics, chronic and acute care management, behavioral health, and cost/utilization.

MEASURE UPDATES INCLUDE ‘STRETCH’ MEASURES TO DRIVE HEALTH OUTCOMES IN THE COMMONWEALTH

In 2018, the PMAC team chose a few “stretch measures” that might have had a few more challenges to them but ultimately were important to impacting the health of Kentuckians. This year, the committee and subcommittees chose a few more of those stretch measures, including Weight Assessment and Counseling for Nutrition and Physical Activity for Children/Adolescents and Depression Response at Twelve Months – Progress Towards Remission. The data extraction required of these measures makes them more challenging to measure.

The full list of changes is as follows:

  • Add Documentation of Signed Opioid Treatment Agreement
  • Add Adolescent Well-Care Visits
  • Add Weight Assessment and Counseling for Nutrition and Physical Activity for Children/Adolescents
  • Add Comprehensive Diabetes Care: Blood Pressure Control
  • Add Depression Response at Twelve Months – Progress Towards Remission
  • Add CG-CAHPS
  • Modify Immunizations for Adolescents to break out HPV
  • Upgrade Comprehensive Diabetes Care: Nephropathy to high priority
  • Upgrade Comprehensive Diabetes Care: Nephropathy to high priority
  • Remove Medication Adherence for Diabetes
  • Remove Medication Adherence for Cardiovascular Disease
  • Remove Antibiotic Avoidance in Adults with Acute Bronchitis.

You can find the complete list of 2019 KCHMS measures here. For more information on the core measures set, click here.

COMMUNITY HEALTH FORUM WILL HIGHLIGHT NATIONAL AND REGIONAL ALIGNMENT EFFORTS

The 2019 KCHMS will be rolled out at a KHC Community Health Forum on September 10, “Driving Health Improvements Through Measurement Alignment.” The Forum will highlight national and local measurement alignment efforts aimed at reducing measurement burden, improving focus, and ultimately measuring what matters most to patients.

Chinwe Nwosu, America’s Health Insurance Plans, will discuss the advancement of quality measurement and improvement through core measures sets. Nwosu, the project manager for the Core Quality Measures Collaborative (CQMC), a broad-based coalition of health care leaders convened by America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP) starting in 2015. It includes Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), the National Quality Forum (NQF), health insurance providers, medical associations, consumer groups, purchasers (including employer group representatives), and other quality collaboratives. The KHC joined this collaborative in recent months. CQMC members work to identify Core Measure Sets – parsimonious sets of scientifically sound measures that efficiently promote a patient-centered assessment of quality and should be prioritized for adoption in value-based purchasing and alternative payment models.

Faith Green, Humana, will also talk about her organization’s journey to align their measures across product lines. KHC’s Stephanie Clouser will introduce the 2019 KCHMS. The morning will end with an expert panel discussion about the current landscape and future of healthcare measurement in the Commonwealth and will include:

  • Jenny Goins, Commissioner, Department of Employee Insurance, Kentucky Personnel Cabinet
  • Michael Hagen, Professor, Dept of Family and Community Medicine, University of Kentucky
  • Amy Mattingly, Provider Collaboration Director, Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kentucky
  • Angela Parker, Director, Program Quality and Outcomes, Department for Medicaid Services
  • Rachelle Seger, Community Health Research Officer, Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky

The Forum will take place from 7:30 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Tuesday, September, 10. As always, registration is free for individuals who work for a KHC member organization and $35 for anyone else. For more information on the Forum, click here.

More information on the core measures set, including future areas of development, will be shared in the future.

Call for Public Comment: Proposed Changes to KY Core Healthcare Measures Set

2018 KY Core Healthcare Measures Set

Modifications are being made to the Kentucky Core Healthcare Measures Set (KCHMS), and healthcare stakeholders throughout the Commonwealth are invited and encouraged to review and comment on those submissions during a public comment period that will run through August 9.

In 2018, the core measures set was developed and released through a public-private partnership with the goal of creating a core measures set for Kentucky stakeholders to align to. The 2018 core measures set includes 34 unique measures, focused in the areas of prevention, pediatrics, chronic and acute care management, behavioral health, and cost/utilization.

This year’s update will ensure that the measures on the core measures set are current, relevant, and sound. The Kentucky Performance Alignment Committee – or PMAC – and its subcommittees have spent the last months reviewing the current measures set, examining potential measures for addition, and confirming or questioning the current measures’ relevance.

This week, the subcommittees presented their final recommendations to the PMAC Oversight Committee, which will finalize the 2019 KCHMS measures on August 20.

If all recommendations are accepted, the core measures set will increase from 34 measures to 39. Measures that would be added include opioid treatment, depression treatment, diabetes blood pressure control, childhood and adolescent well care, and patient experience measures. Measures related to medication adherence and antibiotic avoidance would be removed.

Any healthcare stakeholder is invited to provide feedback for the PMAC Oversight Committee on these recommendations. The public comment period will close August 9, and you can find details on the proposed changes and public comment form here.

Call for Applications – 2019 KY Performance Measures Alignment Committee

The Kentuckiana Health Collaborative is accepting applications for the 2019 Kentucky Performance Measures Alignment Committee (PMAC), which will select the 2019 Kentucky Core Healthcare Measures (KCHMS), a core healthcare measures set for Kentucky’s primary care providers, with the ultimate goal of aligning the priorities of Medicare, Medicaid, and commercial insurers.

The KCHMS was first released in June 2018 and includes 34 primary care measures in the areas of preventive care, behavioral health, chronic and acute care, pediatric care, and cost and utilization. The intent is to align measurement efforts toward shared areas of focus, making Kentucky one of the first states in the nation to create a healthcare measurement set.

PMAC, which selects the measures that are included in the core measures set, consists of an oversight committee and five subcommittees in the follow areas:

  • Behavioral Health
  • Chronic and Acute Care
  • Pediatrics
  • Preventive
  • Cost and Utilization

The 2019 PMAC team will consist of previous committee members and new applicants. Slots are limited and will reflect a diverse mix of payers, providers, purchasers, and consumers.

While the 2018 KCHMS timeline was approximately one year from conception to release, this year’s cycle will be more condensed and run from June 2019 to August 2019. Both subcommittee and oversight committee members will participate in an overview call in early June, each subcommittee will meet approximately twice in June and July, and the oversight committee will meet an anticipated two times in July and August. The 2019 KCHMS measures will be finalized by August 31, 2019.

For more information about the project, visit the KCHMS page on the KHC website. To apply for the oversight committee or subcommittee, click here.

Submissions are due by Friday, May 31. Any questions, please contact Stephanie Clouser at sclouser@khcollaborative.org.

Recent Studies Reveal Variation in Price and Quality Among Kentucky’s Hospitals

New Hospital Safety Grade state rankings by the nonprofit The Leapfrog Group shows Kentucky ranks 33rd in overall hospital safety, holding that spot for the second time in a row. This, when paired with the new study released last week by RAND Corp., reiterates that hospitals in the Commonwealth vary in both price and quality.

In the Spring 2019 Hospital Safety Grade rankings, Kentucky’s share of “A” hospitals was just 21%, down from nearly 24% in the Fall 2018 rankings. Leapfrog uses an easy-to-digest A-F grading scale, with “A” being the best. Nearly 70% of Kentucky’s 52 hospitals received a “C” or below rating, compared to the nationwide average of 43%. A new study released by The Leapfrog Group along with the state rankings showed that avoidable deaths due to errors, accidents, injuries, and infections have an 88% greater risk at “C” hospitals and 92% greater risk at “D” and “F” hospitals.

RAND STUDY SHOWS VARIATION IN PRICE, QUALITY IN KENTUCKY’S HOSPITALS

In addition to the Leapfrog safety rankings, Kentucky was one of 25 states that was included in last week’s RAND hospital price transparency report, which for the first time used actual payments by privately insured employers to report inpatient and outpatient prices by hospital. The report shows prices as a percent of what Medicare paid for the same services, thus making these relative prices comparable across the country. The study has been a hot news item in the healthcare world, featured in publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and Forbes.

Kentucky ranks fourth lowest in price of the 25 states in the RAND hospital price transparency study.

Overall, Kentucky came out favorably for its relative pricing to Medicare for private insurance in the report, well under the national average of the states in the study. Of the 25 states included in the data, Kentucky ranked fourth lowest in prices paid to hospitals, at 186% of Medicare compared to the national average of 241%. Similar to what the report illuminates nationally, there is large variation in price – inpatient, outpatient, and overall – among Kentucky’s facilities.

The RAND study looked at the CMS Hospital Compare five-star rating to highlight variation on quality, and that system illuminated similar trends as Leapfrog’s new results. Looking at the CMS ratings, which, like Leapfrog, puts hospitals into five levels of performance, more of Kentucky’s facilities named in the RAND study have poor to average ratings compared to the nation as a whole – 84% compared to the nation’s 51%. This means that just 16% of Kentucky’s hospitals are considered above average or excellent by CMS Hospital Compare.

KHC BRINGS IN RAND STUDY LEADERS FOR COMMUNITY FORUM

These variations in price and quality in Kentucky’s hospitals will be the focus of the Kentuckiana Health Collaborative’s June 4 Community Health Forum, which will bring in the RAND study’s leaders to dive into the results and what this means for Kentucky.

Gloria Sachdev, President and CEO for Employers’ Forum of Indiana, which partnered with RAND on the study, will walk through the study results, focusing on Kentuckiana and Kentucky’s hospital prices and how they compare to the rest of the nation. We will also hear from an employer, Indiana University, that was part of that first-year study in Indiana to discuss how seeing hospital pricing information has impacted their benefit strategy.

Although hospital pricing is important to all stakeholders, this event will be particularly relevant to those interested in employee health benefits, health plan design, and provider payment. RAND is now recruiting more participants for the next iteration of the study, so any employer or health plan that is interested in participating is encouraged to attend and for more information on what is involved.

Register today to join the conversation at the UofL Shelby Campus Founders Union Building. As with most KHC Community Health Forums, attendance is free for KHC members and $35 for non-members, which includes the program, networking, and breakfast. If you are unsure if your organization is a member of the KHC, see the full list here.

KHC Joins Coalitions Across the Country to Address Healthcare Affordability

Kentucky, like the rest of the United States, has a problem. Healthcare costs continue to rise. However, paying more for healthcare does not mean we get better healthcare services, and it does not mean we are healthier as a result. We pay too much for care and it is causing financial, emotional, and clinical harm to individuals, businesses, and communities.

The current situation is unsustainable; harder choices are coming. There are proven approaches to make headway, but we have to work together to achieve success. We can’t blame the current state of affordability on any individual group of people. We all created the situation. It will take all of us working together to solve it.

Healthcare costs continue to rise. However, paying more for healthcare does not mean we get better healthcare services, and it does not mean we are healthier as a result.

The KHC has long been a trusted partner in reporting healthcare quality performance data. But you can’t address quality without also looking at value. Solving one issue in isolation does not achieve the healthcare affordability goal. Healthier populations use fewer healthcare resources. Healthier populations create more productive communities. Unnecessary services are causing clinical, emotional, and financial harm. Administrative waste is a financial burden on patients and providers while also burning out providers.

To begin the conversation locally around healthcare affordability, the KHC has joined the Network for Regional Healthcare Improvement (NRHI) and other regional coalitions across the country to bring healthcare affordability to the forefront of healthcare transformation efforts. The movement is focused on health, price, and waste — the three drivers of affordable healthcare. In joining this effort, NRHI and its coalitions like KHC will leverage their collective strengths on efforts to improve affordability while preserving and improving quality. In addition, partnering with other national entities committed to solving the healthcare affordability problem will strengthen the effectiveness and reach of these efforts.

The campaign, called Affordable Care Together, is an approach that puts communities at the center of the solution; the movement is led by neutral, non-profit conveners who build on existing, multi-stakeholder efforts to improve health, reduce price, eliminate waste, and collectively create greater awareness and solutions.

As part of Affordable Care Together, myself and KHC leaders Teresa Couts, Randa Deaton, Emily Beauregard, Don Lovasz, and Amanda Elder will join leaders from every segment of the U.S. healthcare system at the Ronald Reagan Building in Washington, D.C. for a day-long summit next week, addressing our country’s healthcare affordability crisis. We will bring back the lessons and ideas that we learn and put them to use, hosting a Community Health Forum in December called “The Path to Affordable Healthcare.” The half-day event will bring together key healthcare stakeholders and like-minded local change agents, who will help develop a community action plan to address healthcare affordability in our community.

Look in coming weeks for more content on healthcare affordability, including reflections from the summit in Washington, D.C. There are ways we can work together to change the system and make it sustainable for current and future generations. By working together, we can make a difference.

 Learn more about Affordable Care Together

KY Core Measures Set Reflects Diversity of Thought, Collaboration

This week, I listened to a recent episode of one of my favorite podcasts, NPR’s Hidden Brain, which explores the unconscious patterns that drive human behavior. This particular episode was about research that suggests that assembling people into groups that are diverse produces more creative results.

As I listened to the episode, I thought of the Kentucky Performance Alignment Committee (PMAC), the measures alignment initiative the KHC led with the Kentucky Department for Medicaid Services. Consisting of more than 70 experts from across the Commonwealth of Kentucky, there was no shortage of diversity in the oversight committee and four subcommittees.

I think our results reflect that diversity.

The final core measures set includes 32 unique measures, focused in the areas of prevention, pediatrics, chronic and acute care management, behavioral health, and cost/utilization. The PMAC team includes expert volunteers from varying backgrounds and geographic regions. These various stakeholders, some of which have competing priorities, have spent the last several months engaging in consensus-based discussions, often coming to some surprising agreements. Because we created a “limited” set, to reduce complexity and improve focus, committee members had to make tough decisions to select only the measures that have significant impact.

Many of the measures are ones that anyone with a healthcare measurement background would quickly recognize. But our PMAC committee also chose a few “stretch measures” that might have a few more challenges to them but ultimately are important to impacting the health of Kentuckians. One or two of these measures I thought for sure would get thrown out early in the process, but I think were included as a direct result of getting diverse minds at the same table, which elevated the results. I’m proud of our core set of measures, and I hope that PMAC members feel the same way.

I was also struck by the enthusiasm and passion that was exhibited by PMAC members. Each of the members answered questions about their interest and involvement in healthcare measurement as part of the application process. I am inspired and humbled by some of their responses, which reflect their commitment to healthcare quality in the Commonwealth.

PMAC members will be sharing their own reflections in upcoming weeks. We have already published a piece by Michael Hagen, MD, about his experience serving on PMAC.

I’m excited for the next steps in this initiative: selecting a community-level opioid measure, securing letters of support, and establishing an ongoing review process.

PRESS RELEASE: Kentucky Core Healthcare Measures Set Announced

Louisville, Kentucky, July 26, 2018: Kentucky now has an agreed upon set of healthcare measurement priorities. The Kentucky Core Healthcare Measures Set (KCHMS) was developed through a public-private partnership between the Kentucky Department for Medicaid Services (KDMS), within the Cabinet for Health and Family Services (CHFS), and the Kentuckiana Health Collaborative (KHC). The Commonwealth becomes one of the first states in the nation to enact a healthcare measurement set.

The purpose of this effort is to get Kentucky’s health plans and employers to reward primary care and pediatric providers on a shared set of relevant measures to drive improved health, quality of care, and value, to reduce administrative complexity, and to align healthcare organizations to have a shared focus.

For the last year, over 70 experts that provide, pay, purchase, and consume healthcare across Kentucky met as members of the Kentucky Performance Measures Alignment Committee (PMAC). They identified Kentucky’s current measurement situation is as follows:

  • Insurers and government programs define quality differently and are often unaligned in scope and focus
  • Primary care providers are incented on too many quality measures, 89 in 2018
  • Providers and their teams are overwhelmed with the burden of state, federal, and commercial measurement requirements

The new core measures set contains 32 measures, less than half of the number of 89 currently incented measures in Kentucky by various state and national programs. Measures are focused in the areas of prevention, pediatrics, chronic and acute care management, behavioral health, and cost/utilization. The PMAC team is currently requesting letters of support from key healthcare organizations

“It has been truly inspiring to see Kentucky’s various stakeholders come together for the good of Kentucky’s residents to drive improvements in health,” said Stephanie Clouser, KHC Data Scientist and PMAC coordinator.

“The Kentucky Medicaid team, which includes not only state government representation, but also partners from nationally prominent health insurance corporations, is committed to ensuring that every citizen can access health care that is proven in terms of quality and patient experience,” concluded Chief Medical Officer for Kentucky Medicaid, Gil Liu, MD, MS. “We look forward to building on this highly collaborative work of developing a core set of measures, to go forward and successfully accomplish measurably better health outcomes.”

The full list of measures can be found here. A public webinar will be held on Thursday, July 26, from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. EST, to give an overview of the initiative and give Kentucky’s healthcare stakeholders a chance to ask questions of PMAC Chairs Gil Liu, KDMS, and Randa Deaton, KHC.

About the KHC: The Kentuckiana Health Collaborative (KHC) is a non-profit organization comprised of representatives who have a major stake in improving the health status and the healthcare delivery system in Greater Louisville and Kentucky. The KHC creates a space for multiple stakeholders to work collaboratively toward the Triple Aim goals of Better Health, Better Care, and Better Value. For more information on the KHC, visit www.KHCollaborative.org.

About CHFS: The Cabinet for Health and Family Services is home to most of the state’s human services and healthcare programs, including the Department for Medicaid Services, the Department for Community Based Services the Department for Public Health, the Department for Aging and Independent Living and the Department for Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities. CHFS is one of the largest agencies in state government, with nearly 8,000 full- and part-time employees located across the Commonwealth focused on improving the lives and health of Kentuckians.

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PMAC Participants Use Objective and Methodical Process to Select Core Measures

Michael D. Hagen

(Note: This guest post was written by Michael D. Hagen, MD, FAAFP, Professor, Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, and retired Senior Vice President, American Board of Family Medicine. )

I had the privilege to serve on and participate in both the Preventive Measures subcommittee and the Performance Measures Alignment Committee of the Kentuckiana Health Collaborative. I served both as a representative of primary care providers in my role as Senior Vice President of the American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM), and as a medical educator in my role as a Professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine in the University of Kentucky College of Medicine (while I retired from the ABFM in January 2018, I believe that perspective remains valid and appropriate to the task). In both roles, I hoped to inform discussions on the real and perceived burdens primary care physicians express in meeting oftentimes duplicative and contradictory performance measures. I hoped to contribute to a parsimonious and harmonious set of measures that payors and other constituents could accept as sufficiently comprehensive to meet reporting needs while minimizing the burden of reporting.

Interestingly, I learned that other provider group representatives shared the same concerns! They all recognized that the plethora of available measures oftentimes fail to capture the value provided by primary care, and that many of these measures entailed significant reporting challenges (in terms of issues such as data accessibility and veracity.) Additionally, in spite of the growing call for patient-reported outcomes measures (PROM), the group recognized the challenges of collecting (e.g. cost, incorporating into workflow) and validating such indicators.

As we considered measures, the discussions included all of the above considerations, and, thankfully, all participants took an objective and unbiased view of each indicator…no outspoken, vociferous champions here! We looked at each measure from the standpoint of validity, accessibility of data, ease of reporting, and relationship to the Commonwealth’s healthcare challenges and needs. Interestingly, several areas that represent significant issues in Kentucky didn’t make the list: for example, low dose CT screening for early lung cancer in smokers. Lung cancer obviously represents a major problem in Kentucky, but the discussions highlighted a substantial concern with recommending the practice in the measures set: no validated available measures! While several committee members advocated strongly for the practice, the group held to its commitment to including only validated measures (we obviously all expressed the hope that such measures will become available in the near future!).

Responding to the multiplicity, overlap, and oftentimes contradictory definitions of measures, and challenges in data collection, have contributed to physician burnout. In spite of the energy expended in this endeavor, all this effort has yet to demonstrate substantial improvements overall in patient outcomes that matter. In particular, as insurers and payors move to value-based payment models, we need to assure providers that the measures used to establish payments represent valid assessments of the value that providers’ care adds to patients’ wellbeing. I hope that insurers and other stakeholders will recognize the careful consideration that went into creation of the recommended measures sets. These represent a parsimonious and carefully considered set of indicators that should support the needs of payors and providers alike.

Kentucky Core Healthcare Measures Set Finalized

Stephanie Clouser

Nine months. That’s how long it takes to develop and birth a baby.

It’s also how KHC co-director Randa Deaton has described the KHC’s initiative with Kentucky Department for Medicaid Services to create a core set of primary healthcare measures, which began approximately nine months ago and was completed last night.

Folks, reducing from 89 incented measures to a set of 32 definitely felt very much like birthing a baby.

The journey to create a core measures set for the Commonwealth of Kentucky began last summer, when KHC co-directors Randa Deaton and Teresa Couts met with then-Secretary of the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services Vickie Yates Brown Glisson and discovered a mutual interest in addressing measurement mayhem through alignment. Thus began a partnership with the Kentucky Department for Medicaid Services (KDMS) to create a core healthcare measures set for Kentucky’s primary care providers, with the ultimate goal of aligning the priorities of Medicare, Medicaid, and commercial insurers. The project was announced in September by Glisson, and soon after, four subcommittees formed in key areas got to work, evaluating national core measures sets, Kentucky performance data, organizational healthcare priorities, and more.

This spring, subcommittees presented their recommendations to a large oversight committee, which spent the next few months reviewing the recommendations and confirming the final set. The Kentucky Performance Measures Alignment Committee (PMAC) oversight committee and four subcommittees were made up of more than 70 expert volunteers from varying backgrounds and geographic regions. These various stakeholders, some of which have competing incentives, have spent the last several months engaging in consensus-based discussions, often coming to some surprising agreements. Because we created a “limited” set, to reduce complexity and improve focus, committee members have had to make tough decisions to select only the measures that have significant impact.

KENTUCKY CORE HEALTHCARE MEASURES SET

The resulting final set includes 32 primary care measures, 21 of which are considered high priority, focused in the areas of prevention, pediatrics, chronic and acute care management, behavioral health, and cost/utilization. This is less than half of the number of 89 currently incented measures in Kentucky by various programs. Many of the measures are ones that anyone with a healthcare measurement background would quickly recognize. But our PMAC committee also chose – wisely, in my opinion – a few “stretch measures” that might have a few more challenges to them but ultimately are important to impacting the health of Kentuckians.

This list of leading quality indicators is but a start toward driving meaningful measurement in Kentucky. PMAC members also got a chance to identify areas of development for future iterations of the measures set. Sometimes this involved listing existing measures that need improvement or establishment and sometimes these were blanket statements identifying the need to develop a measure in a particular area.

NEXT STEPS

The confirmation of the KCHMS is not the end of PMAC. Now that the set has been finalized, there is new work to be done. We have planned multiple events around Kentucky Core Healthcare Measures Set (KCHMS), including a webinar on July 26 and an employer forum in October. Additionally, we now begin the process of working with organizations to adopt this core measures set and utilize it in contracting. You can find all the news related to PMAC here.

Thank you to everyone who participated in this initiative, whether by serving on or chairing a committee, taking meetings with KHC staff members, securing meeting space, or providing expertise on measure nuances. Now let’s put this set to use. When we focus on everything, we focus on nothing. However, when we focus on the right things, we can drive meaningful change.

View the Kentucky Core Healthcare Measures Set

Last Chance for Public Comment, KY Core Healthcare Measures Set

The public comment period for the Kentucky Core Healthcare Measures Set ends on Thursday, May 24, 2018 at 11:59 p.m. (ET). This is the final opportunity for healthcare stakeholders to weigh in on the relevance and feasibility of new and revised measures.

The Kentucky Core Healthcare Measures Set includes 38 provider performance measures in the areas of prevention, pediatrics, chronic and acute care, and behavioral health. Ultimately, the expectation is for the measures set to be adopted by public and private organizations to better focus improvement efforts toward shared areas.

The PMAC Executive Committee will weigh the opinions, suggestions, and comments resulting from the public comment period. If you are a healthcare stakeholder in Kentucky, please download and review the draft KCHMS on the KHC website here and fill out an online form to submit your comments.

Please email any questions to sclouser@khcollaborative.org.